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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
the vatican. why did pope benedict really say he is stepping down? and what does it mean for a billion catholics around the world? >>> in ruins. a tornado roaring up the street. electrical wires dangling. the massive cleanup tonight in one american town. >>> rescue. thousands of people stranded on a vacation cruise ship, cut off from the world. and the lifeboat on the way to try to help them tonight. >>> and honor and valor. the emotional ceremony for a heroic soldier. the lesson he teaches about the american spirit. and an unlikely little star in a suit and tie. >>> good evening on this monday night. a centuries old tradition has been shattered by a surprise. pope benedict, chosen to be pope for life, today announced he will resign, citing his failing strength and health. and the toll of his seven years, nine months and 24 days as pope etched on his face. there he was, as we saw him on day one. and now, much thinner, frailer. this is unchartered territory for 1 billion catholics around the world. no pope has resigned in 598 years. and it's happening just 48 hours before the holy seaso
happened. jeffrey? >> reporter: good evening, diane. it's as if an earthquake has hit the vatican. the lights are still on, the buildings are still standing, but people here rocked by the surprise resignation of benedict xvi. it began as a routine vatican ceremony, but the pope's announcement in latin was anything but routine. "i have come to the certainty that my strengths, due to an advanced age, are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the papal ministry." with that, for the first time in 600 years, a pope is resigning. benedict xvi was already old, 78, when he became pope. that was 2005. here he is almost eight years later, clearly frail and feeble. his older brother, father georg ratzinger, said today benedict is having trouble walking and had been advised by his doctors to stop traveling overseas. benedict will relinquish his papacy on february 28th. >> today's decision by benedict xvi came as a huge surprise to me, and, i think, to everyone in rome and everyone in the vatican. >> reporter: as a cardinal, joseph ratzinger was known as john paul ii's enforcer of religi
. and the call for a new pope who represents a changing world. abc's david wright is at the vatican for us tonight. >> reporter: at the end of the month, he'll have to move out of the apostolic palace, the pope's official residence since the 17th century. every previous occupant has stayed until he died. pope benedict will be the first to walk out the door. he won't have to walk far. today, the vatican revealed his retirement home is just behind st. peter's. a former nunnery with its own chapel and library. today, the vatican spokesman also disclosed new details about the pope's deteriorating health, revealing he has a pacemaker and he recently underwent surgery to replace the batteries. >> nothing sudden. but over the past few years, he certainly slowed down a bit. >> reporter: already, the focus is on choosing his successor. a process that's not at all like voting for president. >> you try to read god's mind. you say, lord, who do you want as pope? >> reporter: a black pope or an asian pope would make history. one possible candidate? cardinal peter turkson of ghana. >> the new pope has t
and solemn ceremony today. >>> and now, we turn overseas, to rome, and the dramatic scene at the vatican today. pope benedict making his first appearance since his resignation announcement. amid the sacred celebration of ash wednesday. there was a kind of rumbling in rome, a kind of aftershock and abc's dan harris is at the vatican to tell us more. >> reporter: on this ash wednesday, at his last public mass, pope benedict received a rare, rapturous standing ovation. earlier in the day, at a public ceremony, a similar reception, with cheers and tears. benedict was visibly moved. how was the atmosphere in the room? >> electric. solemn and electric at the same time. >> i almost cried. honestly, it was wonderful. >> reporter: beneath the applause, though, there are thorny questions swirling. we were struck by the fact that the pope said again today that he was resigning of his own free will. there's been a real emphasis on pointing out that the pope made this decision of his own volition. and was not pushed. why? >> why is that? because italians love conspiracy theories. >> reporter: he's no
. and now come questions about an american cardinal. abc's david wright at the vatican again tonight. >> reporter: today, britain's cardinal keith o'brien said he will not attend the conclave, because his presence would be a distraction. this weekend, a british newspaper reported that four scottish priests claim o'brien made unwanted sexual advances on them in the 1980s, allegations o'brien denies. it's the latest of several scandals to threaten the dignity of this ancient process. other voting cardinals are known to have covered up for pedophile priests. l.a.'s roger mahony for one. today, president obama's former ambassador to the holy see suggested mahony consider bowing out, too. >> he has to decide for himself in terms of what is in the best interest of the church. >> reporter: and then, there's the italian papers full of reports of a dossier prepared "for the pope's eyes only," supposedly detailing a sex and blackmail scandal in the vatican. this is beginning to sound like a dan brown novel. >> well, the catholic church doesn't do dull. >> reporter: turns out a dossier does exi
the culture within the walls of the vatican. it's believed only the pope and three cardinals know what's inside. late word tonight on just what pope benedict will be called after he resigns. and so i want to bring in abc's global affairs anchor christiane amanpour in rome tonight. christiane, always great to see you. and first here, what have we learned about pope benedict once he officially steps down? >> reporter: we were told by the vatican that the pope will continue to be called benedict, he will continue to be called his holiness and given the title pope emeritus. we understand that he'll continue to wear white, but not the, you know, elaborate papal vestments. a simple white outfit that he will dispense with his signature red prada shoes and perhaps wear some brown leather shoes. and that he will live in a monastery here within the vatican. david? >> putting the red prada shoes aside. very quiet scene behind you there tonight, but tomorrow, a much different picture. >> reporter: so, tens of thousands of pilgrims are expected here in st. peter's square tomorrow, where the pope wi
's long been an unwritten rule -- no pope from a superpower. but vatican watchers say times have changed. >> i think people realize that, you know, a cardinal from the united states is not necessarily going to represent u.s. political interest. so, i think there's more openness to it. >> reporter: o'malley is one of two american names being floated. the other? new york's cardinal timothy dolan, who scoffed at the idea when diane recently asked him. >> what about you? >> is this abc evening news or comedy central? what is -- you are -- >> reporter: and o'malley isn't holding his breath either. >> i haven't lost any sleep about it, and i have -- i have bought a round trip ticket, so, i'm counting on coming home. >> reporter: in boston, it would be the religious equivalent of the red sox beating the yankees. >> we always like boston over new york. >> i'm sure boston will represent the vatican very well. >> it will be interesting to see how it plays out. >> reporter: in fact, both americans are long shots. popes tend to be from europe. specifically italy. the last time the conclave chose a n
there until restorations are completed on the vatican convent right here. there, the pope will live out his days in prayer and study. in his words, diane, he will be hidden to the world. >> all right, george, our thanks to you. and, of course, when the pope leaves, it will be up to the cardinals and their vote. and here's one snapshot from a modern pilgrimage. there he was, boston's cardinal o'malley, on the plane to rome, with a newspaper, wearing his signature simple brown robe. and we were all rewinding this tape today. seven years ago, take a look. there, sealed with a ribbon, a key turns and a new pope, pope benedict, is shown around his new home. the papal apartment. there are ten rooms, floors of 16th century marble. a library crowned with an antique ceiling. and soon, another man will be passing through that door, a pope chosen in the mysterious ritual known as the conclave. abc's david wright tells us about the ancient vote to come. >> reporter: before the cardinals file into the sistine chapel and lock the doors behind them, technicians will have pulled up the floorboards to insta
charge. >>> and still overseas, we have word from the vatican tonight. pope benedict has offered a clue about his plans for the future. telling some clergymen today he would soon be hidden to the world. we know he's going to move into a former con vent inside vatican city, but today seemed to be singling he will not play any public role again once he steps down. >>> and now we head to washington, because just this afternoon the president was thrown a curveball. he saw his secretary of defense nominee chuck hagel would be confirmed, but jonathan karl tells us it didn't happen. >> reporter: today was the day the president hoped he would have a new secretary of defense, but republicans blocked a straight up or down vote on his nomination. they don't like him for a lot of reasons, but their complaint today, was they said he didn't turn over enough financial information. the white house is calling this unconscionable and the president in an online chat said, quote, it's unfortunate this kind of politics at a time when i'm presiding over a war in afghanistan and i need a secretary of defense.
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)